Monday, September 21, 2009

We don't use a term "must" in US?

I read an article about American social life and I have found a very interesting facts about the United States; that people do not use a term "must" frequently in their social life even though the term "must" is one of the most basic vacabularies that English learners face.

When American people advice their friends or the others they know, they do not use the term must or have to be. It is something that is cultural thing in United States, even though they advice to their friends about something, they do not force the others to do something because they believe the choice is the oppenent's freedom.

It is a very interesting article at least for me, because in South Korea, most of people advice to the others using the term "must" even though the people are not aware of the opponents if they are doing something wrong. American way to advice to the others might seem to be very kind, but I realised it that the advisor isn't 100% thinking for the opponent.
http://v.daum.net/link/4240871

3 comments:

marcio said...

this is interesting indeed...

Alisha Stafford Feitosa said...

Yes; I hadn't really thought about this, but the word "must" sounds very strong and demanding. If someone tells you that you must do something, it sounds like he's giving you an order or only allowing you one option (as if his way is the only way possible and to do things differently would only lead to trouble).

Where did you read this article?

SeungYup Han said...

Mrs. Feitosa// I was just web surfing and I saw this article in my own language. I thought it was interesting so I wanted to share, consequently I translated into English =P